first_imgShare on WhatsApp Share on Twitter Australia rugby union team … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Rugby Australia risks galvanising Pasifika around Israel Folau Since you’re here… Australia sport Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Paea Wolfgramm Israel Folau’s future in Australian rugby may be decided within two weeks after his code of conduct hearing was set for Saturday 4 May. The following day has been reserved in case the hearing runs into a second day.The Wallabies superstar has been charged with a high-level code of conduct breach following his latest controversial social media posts, and will front a three-person panel at Rugby Australia HQ in Sydney. Reuse this contentcenter_img Share via Email Support The Guardian Respected Sydney barrister John West QC will chair the tribunal, with Rugby Australia representative Kate Eastman SC and Rugby Union Players’ Association representative John Boultbee the other panellists. The former solicitor general Justin Gleeson QC will be Rugby Australia’s counsel at the hearing.Unless successful at the hearing, Folau faces the sack after being issued with a “high-level” breach notice last Monday over the posts he made on Twitter and Instagram on 10 April. There is no guarantee the outcome of the hearing will be the final chapter of the saga, as the loser could could consider court action.Folau was stood down by the NSW Rugby Union on 12 April. In their first match without him, the Waratahs scored a crucial Super Rugby win over Australian conference leader Melbourne last Saturday.The RA integrity unit deemed Folau had committed a high-level breach of the professional players’ code of conduct, warranting termination of his employment contract. Folau was given 48 hours to accept that sanction or have the matter referred to a code of conduct hearing, opting for the latter.The religiously motivated Folau attracted a fresh storm of controversy when he posted on Instagram: “Warning. Drunks, homosexuals, adulterers, liars, fornicators, thieves, atheists, idolaters. Hell awaits you. Repent! Only Jesus saves.”The Rugby Australia chief executive, Raelene Castle, said Folau was warned formally and repeatedly last year about expectations of him as a Wallabies and Waratahs player in regards to his social media use, following similar controversial posts. She has stressed the action taken against Folau is about the issue of responsibilities an employee owes to their employer, rather than punishment for his religious beliefs. Israel Folau Topics news Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger Read more Rugby unionlast_img read more

first_imgzoom Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries, part of South Korean Hyundai Heavy Industries Group, revealed that it has completed the world’s first very large crude carrier fitted with an exhaust gas cleaning system which meets the IMO’s 2020 Sulfur Cap requirements.The supper large tanker, boasting 310,000 in dwt and a length of 336 meters, features a SOx scrubber, which can reduce sulfur oxide emissions to less than 0.5 pct from the existing 3.5 pct, according to the shipbuilder.The gas cleaning system is 11 meters high and 8.3 meters wide and uses seawater to clean the exhaust gas waste.The VLCC, named Almi Atlas, is also described as highly energy efficient mainly due to the high-tech rudder and propulsion technology installed onboard.Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries hosted a naming ceremony for the green tanker on Tuesday, March 13. It is the first of two ships ordered by Greek shipowner Almi Tankers in August 2016.The shipbuilder believes the gas cleaning technology would enable it to become the preferred builder of green vessels of the future that would need to replace the outdated vessels in order for shipowners to comply with the 2020 Sulfur cap.Estimates from Clarkson Research indicate that about 10 percent of the total of 92,000 of world’s vessels which will be 20-years old in two years would have to be replaced with environmentally-friendly units.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more