first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Jeffrey Parkinson / USAFALBANY – At Monday’s daily Coronavirus briefing, New York State Governor Cuomo says there will be $25 million in emergency funding going to food banks across the state.He is also asking any philanthropists that can donate funding to contact the governor’s office at COVIDPhilantropies@Exec.ny.gov.Food banks across New York State have seen a surge in demand. Here is a breakdown by region:40-60% increase across Upstate New York40% increase on Long Island100% increase in New York City200% increase in WestchesterCuomo also announced the creation of the Nourish New York Initiative, which will purchase food and products from upstate farms and direct those products to food banks across New York State. The state is also partnering with companies like Cabot, Chobani, and Upstate Niagara, as well as the Dairy Famers of America, to purchase excess milk and dairy products, like cheese, and then give those products to the state’s food banks.last_img read more

first_img The famous maras [gangs] began in Guatemala as a social problem. People needed to feel that they belonged, and they found in gangs the family that they didn’t have elsewhere, since the majority of them came from broken or non-existent homes. Children who came into the world without knowing a father’s warmth. They found in gangs precisely what they were missing – brotherhood. They developed a hierarchy, and now the gangs use this hierarchical structure to commit illicit acts and engage in criminal activities directed toward obtaining resources through non-legal means. Now, the other response that I want to give is that being part of a gang is not in itself a crime. A crime is prosecuted when a gang member commits an illicit act. Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: Would you like to add anything else? How can regional cooperation contribute to the fight against illicit trafficking and crime, as well the exchange of police and military intelligence between Guatemala and other countries in the region? To what degree do you consider the gang problem to be a security problem? Is being part of a gang considered a crime in Guatemala? Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: The political constitution of the Republic of Guatemala orders the army [to guarantee] internal and external security, but since the peace agreements were signed in 1986, this mandate has been restricted a little, and this task is assigned to the national civil police. We frequently carry out joint and combined actions with them. We’re taking a stand against the problems arising from drug trafficking both on land and on sea and doing interdiction of some aircraft entering our country. In this way, we’re doing what we can to eradicate or at least neutralize illicit trafficking and also combatting it directly. There’s a fundamental point here, and I want to make the following comment. Organized crime as a whole and drug trafficking, which is a part of it, do not respect borders, either coming or going. Guatemala forms part of a natural bridge, with all the Central American countries, where all types of illicit traffic come and go, including arms, migrants. We need to be in constant communication with neighboring countries in order to pass on to them, and also in order for them to pass on to us, whatever kind of information can make it possible to directly combat any of that illicit traffic I just mentioned. There can be no delay in obtaining precise information about the methods they use and the places [they operate] in order to make it possible to directly fight drug trafficking. What measures have been implemented by the Armed Forces Joint Command in the fight against drug trafficking? What more should be done to combat illicit trafficking?* Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: President Álvaro Colom has started many social programs, but there’s one in particular that’s called “open schools.” Open schools are the same public schools, but for young people of all ages who are not able to go to school during the week. So they use the space on the weekends to learn a trade; they learn to play an instrument, they learn to sing, or a dance that’s in fashion. The idea is to motivate them so that they don’t join gangs. But there are many gang members who take part in these social programs – approximately 247,000 young people are participating in these “open schools” programs. And it’s not only in the capital. There are open schools across the length and breadth of our country, with very positive results. It’s a good program, headed by the president and the first lady, that I feel is giving fast, quick, and well-defined results – in order to prevent young people from continuing to be part of and participate in these gang-related directives. center_img I want to return to what I said at the beginning about this decree that makes it possible to support units of the National Civil Police in combatting drug trafficking and organized crime as a whole. We don’t have the legal possibility of seizing a criminal and booking him. What I can tell you is that if someone is committing an illicit act and is caught in the act, any citizen, including the army, can detain him and take him to the competent authority to have his case heard in the appropriate courts. I have a great deal of respect for what they’re doing and working on in the countries that have taken this initiative to grant the army some kind of police function. We’re supporting the national civil police. Nevertheless, we also have a military police unit, and if it were to become possible someday that we would look at replicating this process underway in other countries, I think that it would be the military police units, because they have police training. I think that it would be very good for these military police units to have this possibility, in order to be more efficient and be able to immediately bring someone who commits an illicit act before the authorities, and let the authorities be the ones to judge them according to the illicit acts they commit. The security priorities of President Álvaro Colom’s administration are combatting and eradicating illicit trafficking: kidnappers, gang members, and even drug trafficking – which is not only a Guatemalan problem. Drug trafficking is a regional problem. It’s also not only a U.S. problem. You’ve been aware of events in this regard and also of the actions underway in Guatemala to combat this plague that does so much damage not only to Guatemalan youth, but to the entire region. In this regard, we think that the threat is a regional one – and the way to combat it is also regional. We’ve made great efforts with U.S. agencies to combat drug trafficking through both air operations and naval operations, where we’ve had demonstrable successes. What are Guatemala’s security priorities at present? Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: Maj. Gen. Abraham Valenzuela González: Some countries in Latin America are studying the possibility of granting police powers to the armed forces in order to enable them to contribute to the fight against crime, gangs, and drug trafficking. What is your opinion about this growing trend in the region? With regard to juvenile delinquents – what is the government doing to prevent them from joining gangs, and what measures are being taking with regard to young people who are already gang members? By Dialogo October 06, 2010 It is interesting that a magazine about the violence and delinquency of Guatemala is published, since it is very difficult to find this information on the Internet. I congratulate you for what are you doing. The Guatemalan Army is an army that respects the laws, that respects human rights, and that is very conscious of the support that should be given to the civil authorities. The army is always subordinate to political authority and is very conscious of its constitutional obligations to support all the civil authorities and be able to take an efficient and effective stand against organized crime as a whole, which does so much damage to Guatemalan society, regional society, and all of Central America, Mexico, and also here in the United States. As I repeat, it’s a natural bridge for the entry of all kinds of illicit traffic. Our best intention is to work together with the civil authorities in order to eradicate as far as possible all kinds of illicit traffic that exist.last_img read more

first_img Diálogo spoke with Rogelio Donadío, Panama’s Vice Minister of Public Security, and Omar Pinzón, Director General of the Panamanian Police, at the conclusion of CENTSEC about “Strengthening Regional Security Cooperation to Combat Transnational Organized Crime,” which was the main theme of the conference, as well as other parallel issues. United States Customs authorities announced on March 24 the seizure of one ton of cocaine in a speedboat, which had actually been discovered five days prior by a border patrol plane that alerted the Panamanian authorities, who intercepted the vessel off the coast of Panama. United States Customs authorities announced on March 24 the seizure of one ton of cocaine in a speedboat, which had actually been discovered five days prior by a border patrol plane that alerted the Panamanian authorities, who intercepted the vessel off the coast of Panama. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Yes, I believe so. SENAFRONT is a sector of the police security force that has been able to stop part of the trafficking of narcotics, people, and illegal immigrants along Panama’s border with Colombia and Panama’s border with Costa Rica, but this work has been done in conjunction with the Armed Forces of Colombia and has also been done in conjunction with the other security sectors in Panama. It’s been a success in terms of working together, working as a team, not just at the national level, among Panamanians, but also internationally, at the level of Panama with the Colombians and certain information as well as working with people from the Southern Command, because we have successfully stopped part of the entry of illegal trafficking of a variety of things along Panama’s borders. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: At all levels. Through joint exercises with the Police and SENAN; information exercises with countries in the area, with Colombia and with Costa Rica; by exchanging information with the intelligence agencies of the United States. That has been part of the work that is being carried out on the border. The action clearly shows the successful joint efforts between the security forces from both countries, and was coincidentally released to the media on the opening day of the Central American Security Conference (CENTSEC 2015), co-sponsored by the United States Southern Command and the Armed Forces of Honduras on March 23-27 in Tegucigalpa. Diálogo: What is that goal? Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Well, what happens is that in my case we talk mainly about the National Police, which is the security sector that gave rise to SENAN and SENAFRONT, which is the security agency that is most often talked about. We talk more about SENAFRONT because they have more people, but we also talk about SENAN. However, at the operational levels and/or results levels, the results have also come in that order. The more units you have, the more results you have. So, first we talk about the Police, then about SENAFRONT, and then about SENAN. Diálogo: And how are these joint efforts carried out? Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Well, right now the interesting thing in Panama is that we have four security sectors, of which three belong to the Ministry of Security and one to the Office of the President. But they have worked together to eradicate these problems and they’ve been able to coordinate and organize their efforts to achieve the short and medium-term targets that we have proposed, which is allowing us to reach the goal that we are working towards. Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: What the minister said is very true. Colón went from one of the most belligerent cities to a city that we now want to make a model, to serve as an example. We can’t say that there aren’t problems, because there are longstanding problems there, but the programs have been more potent because they’re social programs, social development programs. There are opportunities there. People are working, and that has helped us a lot. In the constitutional context, it’s a state strategy formulated by the current administration; the rates have dropped sharply after reorganizing the force for these events. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: At all levels. Through joint exercises with the Police and SENAN; information exercises with countries in the area, with Colombia and with Costa Rica; by exchanging information with the intelligence agencies of the United States. That has been part of the work that is being carried out on the border. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: When President Juan Carlos Varela took office, we wanted a security strategy for the country that would diminish the incidence of crime in Panama by 15%, including homicides, robberies, and theft. These objectives have been fulfilled over these last five years. There are other goals, as I have explained, that also contribute to decreasing insecurity in the countries in the region, which are access to potable water, access to education, access to affordable food. Those three objectives have also been worked on and they have also contributed to the decrease in crime and insecurity. Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: I would like to add a little to what the Vice Minister just said. Indeed, Panama exercises its sovereignty in Defense and Security through a strategy based on what is allowed by the Constitution. For the Defense and Security of the country, the first sector is the National Police. Then there are two other constitutionally established sectors: SENAFRONT, which is the border service, and an aeronaval service, which is handled by SENAN. We’re three forces that are oriented towards different spaces, with successful results because these defense operations are targeting those crossing our territory, the passage of drug traffickers, the international trafficking of persons that Panama and the region have been suffering from quite a bit. These services exercise a function and that’s why I bet that Panama has been successful, despite our limited resources, in the fight against drug trafficking and in helping these people as well, because it’s our duty to assist them, because when we cross the border we find children and women and there are international treaties that say we have to provide them with that protection. So it is through this very focused set of maneuvers established by the president and carried out through the Ministry of Security that we’ve been able to counter this scourge. Diálogo: Can it be said that the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) is a success story that can be used as an example for other countries? Diálogo: If you had to point to the most problematic region in Panama, which would it be? Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Well, what happens is that in my case we talk mainly about the National Police, which is the security sector that gave rise to SENAN and SENAFRONT, which is the security agency that is most often talked about. We talk more about SENAFRONT because they have more people, but we also talk about SENAN. However, at the operational levels and/or results levels, the results have also come in that order. The more units you have, the more results you have. So, first we talk about the Police, then about SENAFRONT, and then about SENAN. Diálogo: And Darién? Diálogo: Can it be said that the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) is a success story that can be used as an example for other countries? Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: What the minister said is very true. Colón went from one of the most belligerent cities to a city that we now want to make a model, to serve as an example. We can’t say that there aren’t problems, because there are longstanding problems there, but the programs have been more potent because they’re social programs, social development programs. There are opportunities there. People are working, and that has helped us a lot. In the constitutional context, it’s a state strategy formulated by the current administration; the rates have dropped sharply after reorganizing the force for these events. Diálogo: And what is your opinion specifically about CENTSEC? Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Colón. Colón is a city that has 16 streets and five avenues, which represents less than one percent of Panama’s total surface area, yet this incredibly small area has crime rates in excess of 15% to 18%. This small city was the most dangerous city in Panama. It is my understanding that the figures indicated that until a year ago, Colón was the third most dangerous city in the Americas. It’s a job that has been handled by the Police together with SENAN, patrolling the waters, and with SENAFRONT. In less than one year and in the first 90 days of this year, which end on March 30, Colón has gone from being the most dangerous place in Panama to being, perhaps, one of the safest places in Panama. Diálogo spoke with Rogelio Donadío, Panama’s Vice Minister of Public Security, and Omar Pinzón, Director General of the Panamanian Police, at the conclusion of CENTSEC about “Strengthening Regional Security Cooperation to Combat Transnational Organized Crime,” which was the main theme of the conference, as well as other parallel issues. center_img Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: In Darién the rates of violence are lower, however there is a lot of trafficking, a lot of movement. What you see more of are the rates of drug trafficking seizures. But in terms of violence, Darién is not among the highest levels. That was the case in Colón a year ago, and now it’s the case in other places because of the balloon effect. If you squeeze a balloon, it gets smaller on one side, but the air goes to other areas. However, the National Police has also seen that the problem is growing in these areas, and they have taken a definitive stance. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: When President Juan Carlos Varela took office, we wanted a security strategy for the country that would diminish the incidence of crime in Panama by 15%, including homicides, robberies, and theft. These objectives have been fulfilled over these last five years. There are other goals, as I have explained, that also contribute to decreasing insecurity in the countries in the region, which are access to potable water, access to education, access to affordable food. Those three objectives have also been worked on and they have also contributed to the decrease in crime and insecurity. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Well, right now the interesting thing in Panama is that we have four security sectors, of which three belong to the Ministry of Security and one to the Office of the President. But they have worked together to eradicate these problems and they’ve been able to coordinate and organize their efforts to achieve the short and medium-term targets that we have proposed, which is allowing us to reach the goal that we are working towards. Diálogo: And what is your opinion specifically about CENTSEC? Diálogo: You mentioned Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN). Why is so much said about SENAFRONT and so little about SENAN? Diálogo: As we saw here at CENTSEC, various countries in the region are turning to the Armed Forces to support the Police and other national security forces in the fight against drug trafficking. Does the fact that Panama does not have an Armed Force complicate the fight against drug trafficking, or is it not an issue? The action clearly shows the successful joint efforts between the security forces from both countries, and was coincidentally released to the media on the opening day of the Central American Security Conference (CENTSEC 2015), co-sponsored by the United States Southern Command and the Armed Forces of Honduras on March 23-27 in Tegucigalpa. Diálogo: And Darién? Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: Panama has always taken part in this conference. The last CENTSEC was even held in Panama. We’re marking our presence here because this is a source of policies, of strategies, of criteria that are very important to our decision-making process. This was a timely and productive conference for us. We were led by the vice minister and the approach that he took with the open dialogue was very attuned to the reality that our countries are experiencing, particularly since we are neighbors with a country that in one way or another is the largest producer of drugs and that uses our route as a link to the region. It also affects us because there is consumption and an internal war against gangs that wind up killing each other. Strategically and geopolitically, Panama is in a privileged position with respect to the rest of the world. We’re a country of services, and a legitimate platform is also being used or exploited by these groups of drug traffickers and terrorists. Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: Panama has always taken part in this conference. The last CENTSEC was even held in Panama. We’re marking our presence here because this is a source of policies, of strategies, of criteria that are very important to our decision-making process. This was a timely and productive conference for us. We were led by the vice minister and the approach that he took with the open dialogue was very attuned to the reality that our countries are experiencing, particularly since we are neighbors with a country that in one way or another is the largest producer of drugs and that uses our route as a link to the region. It also affects us because there is consumption and an internal war against gangs that wind up killing each other. Strategically and geopolitically, Panama is in a privileged position with respect to the rest of the world. We’re a country of services, and a legitimate platform is also being used or exploited by these groups of drug traffickers and terrorists. Director General of the Police Omar Pinzón: I would like to add a little to what the Vice Minister just said. Indeed, Panama exercises its sovereignty in Defense and Security through a strategy based on what is allowed by the Constitution. For the Defense and Security of the country, the first sector is the National Police. Then there are two other constitutionally established sectors: SENAFRONT, which is the border service, and an aeronaval service, which is handled by SENAN. We’re three forces that are oriented towards different spaces, with successful results because these defense operations are targeting those crossing our territory, the passage of drug traffickers, the international trafficking of persons that Panama and the region have been suffering from quite a bit. These services exercise a function and that’s why I bet that Panama has been successful, despite our limited resources, in the fight against drug trafficking and in helping these people as well, because it’s our duty to assist them, because when we cross the border we find children and women and there are international treaties that say we have to provide them with that protection. So it is through this very focused set of maneuvers established by the president and carried out through the Ministry of Security that we’ve been able to counter this scourge. Diálogo: You mentioned Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN). Why is so much said about SENAFRONT and so little about SENAN? Diálogo: What is that goal? Diálogo: If you had to point to the most problematic region in Panama, which would it be? Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Colón. Colón is a city that has 16 streets and five avenues, which represents less than one percent of Panama’s total surface area, yet this incredibly small area has crime rates in excess of 15% to 18%. This small city was the most dangerous city in Panama. It is my understanding that the figures indicated that until a year ago, Colón was the third most dangerous city in the Americas. It’s a job that has been handled by the Police together with SENAN, patrolling the waters, and with SENAFRONT. In less than one year and in the first 90 days of this year, which end on March 30, Colón has gone from being the most dangerous place in Panama to being, perhaps, one of the safest places in Panama. Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: Yes, I believe so. SENAFRONT is a sector of the police security force that has been able to stop part of the trafficking of narcotics, people, and illegal immigrants along Panama’s border with Colombia and Panama’s border with Costa Rica, but this work has been done in conjunction with the Armed Forces of Colombia and has also been done in conjunction with the other security sectors in Panama. It’s been a success in terms of working together, working as a team, not just at the national level, among Panamanians, but also internationally, at the level of Panama with the Colombians and certain information as well as working with people from the Southern Command, because we have successfully stopped part of the entry of illegal trafficking of a variety of things along Panama’s borders. By Dialogo April 09, 2015 Vice Minister Rogelio Donadío: In Darién the rates of violence are lower, however there is a lot of trafficking, a lot of movement. What you see more of are the rates of drug trafficking seizures. But in terms of violence, Darién is not among the highest levels. That was the case in Colón a year ago, and now it’s the case in other places because of the balloon effect. If you squeeze a balloon, it gets smaller on one side, but the air goes to other areas. However, the National Police has also seen that the problem is growing in these areas, and they have taken a definitive stance. Diálogo: And how are these joint efforts carried out? Diálogo: As we saw here at CENTSEC, various countries in the region are turning to the Armed Forces to support the Police and other national security forces in the fight against drug trafficking. Does the fact that Panama does not have an Armed Force complicate the fight against drug trafficking, or is it not an issue? I think a majority of Colombians were very sorry for the murder of the ten military members and I also believe that the peace process is a circus. Those criminals who are in Havana are feeling old and what they want is to avoid justice to enjoy their huge fortune derived from drug trafficking and many other crimes.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A passenger boards a Long Island Rail Road train in Long Beach (Joe Abate).Long Island Rail Road service was mostly back to normal for the Wednesday morning rush hour commute two days after a train that derailed in Penn Station caused widespread delays.The only issues reported during the first normal commute since the incident was a train with equipment trouble on the Montauk Branch that ran nearly an hour late. Mid-day trains are also being replaced with buses between Locust Valley and Oyster Bay while tie replacement work is underway.The LIRR Amtrak, and the Federal Railroad Administration are investigating the cause of the derailment, which required 500 feet of track to be replaced.last_img read more

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has issued a proposal seeking further comment on the definition of an autodialer under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). CUNA has called on the FCC to clarify the definition of autodialer in a May petition to the FCC.The FCC revised the TCPA in 2015, creating several concerns for credit unions seeking to contact members with important information while remaining in compliance with the TCPA.The public notice issued Wednesday comes after a 9th Circuit Court decision. Specifically, the FCC seeks comment on what constitutes an “automated telephone dialing system” (ATDS).The TCPA currently defines an ATDS as “equipment which has the capacity—(A) to store or produce telephone numbers to be called, using a random or sequential number generator; and (B) to dial such numbers.”last_img read more

first_imgMs. Reed, who works for the Michigan League of Conservation Voters, arrived at an elementary school at 5:20 a.m. to begin setting up for the polls opening at 7. She then spent all day working the tabulator, helping people insert their ballot into a machine to be counted before making sure they left with the ubiquitous “I Voted” sticker.She stayed until 9 p.m., leaving upbeat about democracy and her place in it.“I love to make people happy and to see the smiles on these people’s faces, it was really nice,” Ms. Reed said. “I think when you’re smiling and you’ve got that positive energy, it can bounce off of them and make them happy too.”- Advertisement – Even that, Ms. Woodall-Vogg said, was a pretty normal experience.“In previous elections, the police followed me in my car,” she said. “This time it was a matter of how am I going to get there efficiently with a media barrage. It wasn’t out of the ordinary.”- Advertisement – In Michigan, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson recruited more than 30,000 election workers to staff the polls and, in Detroit, work around the clock counting the state’s three million absentee ballots.In Detroit, that meant building three teams of 700 to 800 people each who would begin counting ballots when the polls opened on Election Day and work continuously until the job was finished midday Wednesday. In the August primary, with half as many absentee ballots cast, it took Michigan officials two full days after the election to finish counting, Ms. Benson said.Among the new poll workers was Crystal Reed, a 52-year-old from Warren, Mich.- Advertisement – Luke Broadwater, Nick Corasaniti and Jesse McKinley contributed reporting. – Advertisement –last_img read more

first_img 1/1 About Connatix V67539 Read More Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Wilfried Zaha addressed the Arsenal transfer rumours (Picture: On Sport)Wilfried Zaha refused to rule out a move to Arsenal when asked about his future ahead of the Ivory Coast’s last-16 clash with Mali at the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations.The Gunners have had a bid of £40million rejected for Zaha, with Crystal Palace understood to be holding out for a fee of around £70m for the 26-year-old forward.Arsenal are already lining up a second proposal for Zaha despite leaving Palace ‘furious’ and ‘incensed’ with their opening offer.Zaha, who scored in a 4-1 victory over Namibia on Monday, is keen to push through a move to his boyhood club this summer but, for the time being, Palace stand in the way of his ‘dream’ transfer.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT Top articles While Zaha appeared to give little away in the interview, many Arsenal fans were left convinced that he would be on his way this summer. Skip Wilfried Zaha refuses to rule out Arsenal transfer move HE IS COMMMMIIINNGGGG 🙌🏻🙌🏻🔴🔴🔥🔥❄️❄️✍️🤝. Welcome to Arsenal @wilfriedzaha— Wilfriedbludclutzaha (@wilfbludclut) July 5, 2019 Read More PLAY Advertisement Read More Full Screen Read More Advertisement Video Settings Coming Next Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 6 Jul 2019 1:33 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link952Shares SPONSORED More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAsked about Arsenal’s £40m offer, Zaha told On Sport: ‘I have no comment on it. The only thing that’s on my mind right now is trying to win this cup [AFCON].’Pushed on whether he would like to play for Arsenal, Zaha replied: ‘I don’t know… we’ll see in the future.’ / HES COMING HOMEEEEEEEEEEWILFRIED ZAHA HES COMING HOMEEEE https://t.co/Q7EXnScypI— 1Ö (@torresvcalcio) July 5, 2019Zaha’s brother, Judicael, has pleaded with Palace to let the forward join Arsenal this summer.‘Wilfried will always hold Crystal Palace and their fans in the highest regard and all the support they have given means the world to him,’ he said.‘It is my brother’s dream, though, to play for Arsenal.‘Given all that Wilfried has given to Crystal Palace to help them remain a Premier League club, I hope Palace will be able to see their way to agreeing a deal with Arsenal that allows Wilfried to realise his dream of playing European football for the club he has supported since childhood.’ Read More by Metro Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Welcome @wilfriedzaha— Jack Clare (@JxckAfc) July 5, 2019 Comment 1 min. story Zaha’s coming to Arsenal 🔥🔥🔥— Karim El Araby (@KarimAraby) July 5, 2019 It’s happening ⏳ #arsenal #Zaha https://t.co/fUWW2jBod6— liam (@Liam_GoonerUK) July 6, 2019 Welcome @wilfriedzaha https://t.co/5ta7pjHf5P— moha (@drippern) July 6, 2019 Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Palace have slapped a £70m price tag on ZahaArsenal legend Ian Wright believes Zaha would be a ‘magnificent’ signing for the club.‘We’re trying to get Wilfried Zaha, which would be magnificent,’ the former striker told The South China Morning Post.‘You want competition for places. Defensively, I think everyone can agree, we need some strength in there.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘You can always strengthen in the midfield. Aaron Ramsey’s gone.‘We need that midfielder who is going to join the front guys and try to contribute with goals.‘Goals is a premium so you always want to be linked with a striker that might be able to come and help.’MORE: Juventus approach Manchester United over Romelu Lukaku transfer move He’s coming home— Dhiscursion_fortune (@laurenvictor2) July 5, 2019 Skip Adlast_img read more

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 MORE: Want five-star services at home? The worst homes on Brisbane’s best streets The home was designed by renowned Brisbane architect Shaun Lockyer.Balaam was originally built as part of Hamilton Stage 2 for local developer Don O’Rorke, who sold it for a whopping $11.8m four years ago. The current owner has had the property listed for sale since July last year, running it through expressions of interest campaign and an auction with it now listed for sale by negotiation.The rental listing said the property rivalled “any prestige residence on the international market”.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours ago Rare inner-city estate snapped up 33b Harbour Road, Hamilton.This may be the most expensive home ever rented in the River City — costing as much as a year’s private school fees per month.The property was listed as having been leased out on Friday, with agents Living Here Cush Partners confirming only that a lease had been signed.According to CoreLogic records, the property at 33b Harbour Rd, Hamilton, was listed for rent on May 9 for $3,700 a week, which amounts to a jawdropping $16,000 a month — which is about as much as it costs to send a day scholar to some of Brisbane’s best private schools for the year. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKcenter_img Modern luxury by the water. One of the living rooms opened up to the outdoors.Among its features was an internal lift to all levels, fully climate-controlled wine cellar, open-air fire pit with gas, a parental master suite, fully-equipped gym with shower and sauna, three large outdoor terraces all with city and river views plus several secure children’s play areas, a children’s creche, cubby house and animal enclosure.The home is listed for sale by negotiation with Ray White New Farm. The edge of the pool in the foreground and one of the kitchens beyond.It was designed by architect Shaun Lockyer and built by local Queensland firm Hutchinson Builders.The 1,034sq m home is on a 1,609sq m lot with the house spread across three levels. The home has 48.3m of riverfrontage and has one of the most unique pools in the city — one that’s cantilevered, heated and has an adjoining bar and kitchen. The pool at 33B Harbour Rd, Hamilton, was built cantilevered so that the children could be easily supervised from the kitchen. Perfect spot to chill out this winter.last_img read more

first_imgSouth Korean dry bulk shipping company Pan Ocean has reached an agreement to purchase two tankers from its subsidiary, Pan Ocean Singapore Bulk Carrier.The vessels in question would be acquired for a price of USD 21.25 million, according to the company’s stock exchange release.Scheduled to be finalized during the fourth quarter of 2017, the transaction was decided on in order to improve Pan Ocean’s profitability and efficiency, the company said.During the first half of 2017, Pan Ocean saw its gross profit rise by 12.1 percent to USD 105.6 million, compared to a gross profit of USD 94.2 million reported in the same period a year earlier. For the six months ended June 30, the company’s operating profit was at USD 78.5 million, rising by 13.7 percent from USD 69 million seen in the previous year.Similarly, during the second quarter of 2017, Pan Ocean’s gross profit increased by 16 percent to USD 57.5 million from USD 49.5 million seen a year earlier, while its operating profit stood at USD 43.1 million, rising by 17.4 percent from USD 36.7 million reported in the second quarter of 2016.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

first_imgNZ Herald 2 November 2015Children as young as four are receiving lessons from transgender campaigners – including a man who revealed to primary school classes that he is a “trans man” and was “assigned female” at birth.Thousands of UK pupils have had the controversial classes, in which they are encouraged to explore their gender identities and are questioned on what being a transsexual means, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.Up to 20 primary schools a year pay for the classes, given by campaigners’ organisation Gendered Intelligence. Parents’ groups have reacted with concern that pupils may be ‘frightened’ by the workshops, while experts warned the lessons may confuse young children.Gendered Intelligence has confirmed it teaches pupils of all ages in primary schools, from reception class – where children are aged four and five – up to Year Six, where pupils are aged 10 and 11. The workshops cost an undisclosed sum and have been available since 2008.The Mail on Sunday has seen footage of Gendered Intelligence conducting workshops with primary classes, in a video available for teachers to hire at a cost of $45.In one class, Year Six boys at a Newcastle primary school are asked to describe the ‘girlish’ things they like to do, while the girls say what ‘boyish’ pursuits they enjoy.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/education/news/article.cfm?c_id=35&objectid=11538664last_img read more