first_imgNACOGDOCHES, Texas – In an announcement made Monday, SFA Director of Athletics Ryan Ivey named Erin Scott the head coach for the Ladyjacks’ tennis team. Scott comes to Nacogdoches following a 12-year run as the head women’s tennis coach at current Conference USA and former Southland Conference member UTSA in the Alamo City. “We are excited to welcome Erin to SFA, Nacogdoches and east Texas,” commented Ivey. “She comes to us with great experience in the state of Texas and the Southland Conference. We are looking forward to watching her grow our tennis program.”While in charge of the Roadrunners, Scott amassed 116 wins and reached conference tournament postseason play 10 times during her 12 season in San Antonio. In all, Scott has prepped a total of 12 all-conference players, 16 conference all-academic team members and a CoSIDA Academic All-District choice.”It’s an honor for me to be chosen as the next women’s head tennis coach,” stated Scott. “I want to thank Ryan Ivey and Loree McCary for this incredible opportunity. I am so excited to be a part of Stephen F. Austin and the Lumberjack family. I look forward to leading the women’s tennis program in a way that will make the university and community proud.”During the six seasons in Scott’s tenure where the Roadrunners competed in the Southland Conference (2007-12) the team posted 28 league victories. UTSA’s most successful Southland campaign occurred in 2009 when the squad posted a total of 16 victories – the most wins by the team in a single season in over a half-decade. That year, the Roadrunners finished third in the league standings and made a run to the Southland Conference Tournament championship match.”I would also like to thank Loree McCary for her efforts in leading this process during the transition period,” Ivey continued. “She did a great job vetting candidates and ensuring we get the best coach for our program and student-athletes.”Before accepting the head coaching positing at UTSA in December of 2006, Scott spent three seasons in Madison, Wis., as an assistant coach for Wisconsin. Through Scott’s stay, the Badgers achieved a top-50 national ranking in the 2005 season and earned at-large bids to the NCAA Tournament in both 2004 and 2005. The Badgers’ final ranking of 34th nationally following the conclusion of the 2005 campaign was the second-highest season-ending ranking in the history of the program. As a student-athlete, Scott’s collegiate playing career started in 1998 at Florida before she transferred to Washington following two seasons in a Gator uniform. It was with the Huskies that Scott played her best tennis as the co-captain helped lead Washington to a runner-up finish in the Pac-10 as well as a sixth-place showing at the NCAA Championships. Through her career, Scott dropped just one dual match and competed on four squads that ranked among the nation’s top 10. Scott is the mother of two children – Easton (seven) and Ryder (five).last_img read more

first_imgIn 2004 and again in 2010, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) expanded the blood sugar range it considers a sign of prediabetes, creating tens of millions of potential patients in the United States overnight. Now, the pharmaceutical industry is developing at least 10 classes of drugs targeted at the disease. But prediabetes does little or no harm on its own, and fewer than 2% of prediabetics in the ADA range progress to diabetes each year. That—along with evidence of large payoffs to some doctors in the field—has some wondering whether the entire classification is a dubious diagnosis.Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in miceLupus can be a stubborn disease to treat. Although many struck by the autoimmune condition live relatively normal lives, some suffer from kidney failure, blood clots, and other complications that can be deadly. Now, scientists have found that a novel treatment that wipes out the immune system’s B cells cures mice of the condition. Though the work is preliminary, it has excited researchers because it uses a therapy already approved for people with blood cancer.Has a second person with HIV been cured?Timothy Ray Brown, the only person to be cured of HIV, may finally have company. A decade after Brown became famous as the “Berlin patient,” thanks to a stem cell transplant that eliminated his HIV infection, a similar transplant from a donor who has HIV-resistant cells appears to have cured another man, dubbed the “London patient.”The Black Death may have transformed medieval societies in sub-Saharan AfricaIn the 14th century, the Black Death swept across Europe, Asia, and North Africa, killing up to 50% of the population in some cities. But archaeologists and historians have assumed that the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, carried by fleas infesting rodents, didn’t make it across the Sahara Desert. Now, some researchers point to new evidence from archaeology, history, and genetics to argue that the Black Death likely did sow devastation in medieval sub-Saharan Africa. 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Country (left to right): JOHN BAZEMORE/AP PHOTO; STEPHAN SCHMITZ; 3D4MEDICAL/SCIENCE SOURCE Vaccine opponents attack U.S. science panelThe U.S. antivaccine movement has found a new front for its attacks on scientists and their work: gatherings of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which recommends which vaccines Americans should receive. Since last summer, increasing numbers of vaccine opponents have come to ACIP meetings, held three times a year at the campus of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, to vent their anger at the 15 experts on the panel during the public comments section—and to lambaste vaccination in general.The war on ‘prediabetes’ could be a boon for pharma—but is it good medicine? Top stories: antivax protests, the war on prediabetes, and a possible cure for lupus Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more