first_img Laptops Computers Desktops Share your voice Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Nvidia Tags Nvidia announced at this year’s Game Developer’s Conference that it would be bringing DirectX ray tracing (DXR) support to its older Pascal-based graphics cards, so it’s time to buckle in: The drivers are now ready for download. But you may not find the tradeoff between performance and the potentially enhanced quality worth it.The Pascal-generation GTX cards supported include: Titan XP Titan X GTX 1080 TI GTX 1080 GTX 1070 TI GTX 1070 GTX 1060 6GB The Volta-based Titan V and Turing-based GTX 1660 and 1660 TI are also supported. You’ll be able to get the Game Ready driver via GeForce Experience or on GeForce.com, along with some new whizzy demos.The new generation of RTX GPUs based on Nvidia’s Turing architecture arrived last summer, bringing two headline features: processing cores devoted to ray tracing (RT cores) — the same kind of rendering that’s used in almost every 3D animation — and Tensor cores for accelerating the neural network processing which underlies DLSS (Deep Learning Super-Sampling), Nvidia’s new AI-based scaling algorithms which more realistically simulate detail when the graphics processing load starts to punish performance.A less glamorous advance is the concurrent floating-point execution pipeline, which improves overall performance with parallel processing for the myriad calculations which underlie rendering.Ray tracing can make games look better, providing more realistic reflections and shadows, with a lot less work for the developers: The less manual tuning for individual scenes they have to do the more they’ll be able to concentrate on improving the overall visual quality of the game. 0 2:12 17 Photos The DXR programming interface makes ray tracing easily scalable for developers. In other words, they can define rules which determine how to prioritize rendering tasks like reflections and shadows and to what level of accuracy. DXR then applies those rules based on how powerful your hardware is.By opening DXR to the vast installed base of older GTX cards, developers have a lot more incentive to incorporate ray tracing into their games, without any extra work, than they have for the small number of pricey RTX GPUs in laptops and desktops.But here’s where the technical nonsense matters. Pascal-based cards, because they have no RT cores, are really not up to the processing challenges of full-on ray tracing, so DXR will dumb down the effects to fit within the capabilities of the card. And even then you’ll still be taking a performance hit — for effects that may be so subtle as to not be worth it.And it seems like the more noticeable the effect, the more processing it tends to require, with reflections (we like the shiny shiny) and global illumination (which can simulate the changing light over the course of a day, for example), being the most demanding.The newer priced-to-sell Turing-based GTX 1660 and 1660 Ti don’t have any RT cores either. What they do have is the improved floating-point performance. So they’ll still take a performance hit in exchange for slightly better realism, just not as much as some of the older cards.While ultimately I think ray tracing will become common — it always takes some time for new hardware technologies to ramp up and prices to come down — it’s possible that opening it up to cards that can’t do it justice may backfire. Though Nvidia’s working hard to manage expectations, I think the exercise will leave a lot of gamers with an “is that all there is?” letdown rather than a “this is so worth plonking down $350 to upgrade to RTX!” attitude. We’ll have to wait and see what actual gaming reveals. The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 See the first Nvidia RTX gaming laptops in actionlast_img read more

first_imgTribune Publishing Co, owner of the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, said Los Angeles billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong has invested $70.5 million in the company, becoming its second largest shareholder.Tribune also rejected Gannett Co Inc’s latest takeover offer of $15 per share, but said on Monday that it would allow Gannett, the publisher of USA Today, access to some confidential corporate information. Reuters first reported the news Sunday.Tribune’s shares closed down 15 percent on Monday.Soon-Shiong, through his fund Nant Capital LLC, will hold about 12.9 percent in Tribune and join the publisher’s board as vice chairman on June 2.Soon-Shiong, a South African-born surgeon, is part-owner of the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team and a founder of two drug companies, which he sold for a total of $8.6 billion.Nant Capital has also entered into a standstill agreement with Tribune, limiting its ability to raise its stake in the publisher.Soon-Shiong is also chairman and chief executive of biotech company NantKWest Inc and is one of the highest paid chief executives in America. He took NantKWest public last June.TRIBUNE WANTS NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENTWhile Tribune rejected Gannett’s latest takeover offer, it invited Gannett to agree to a “mutual non-disclosure agreement” to share information about a potential deal. The agreement, which has not been signed by either company, has become a source of contention.Gannett first said in a statement that the proposed non-disclosure agreement “would require Gannett to effectively cease any public proxy solicitation or other public pursuit of a transaction.”Tribune, in response, said that the agreement it offered does not prevent Gannett from continuing to pursue its withhold campaign or other proxy contests.Gannett responded by saying the agreement does not have a restriction against a proxy contest, but it does restrict public disclosures that could inhibit a proxy fight. It said Tribune is asking Gannett not to include references to discussions or negotiations in proxy statements or tender offer documents, and that its advisers are preparing a revised version.Last week, Gannett asked Tribune Publishing shareholders to withhold support for the latter’s eight nominees to the board of directors at its annual meeting June 2.Proxy adviser Institutional Shareholder Services Inc recommended that Tribune shareholders vote for the nominated directors.Oaktree Capital Management LP, a major shareholder of Tribune, is also pushing for a deal with Gannett and urged the company to form an independent board to consider the proposal.last_img read more