first_img Laptops Computers Desktops Share your voice Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Nvidia Tags Nvidia announced at this year’s Game Developer’s Conference that it would be bringing DirectX ray tracing (DXR) support to its older Pascal-based graphics cards, so it’s time to buckle in: The drivers are now ready for download. But you may not find the tradeoff between performance and the potentially enhanced quality worth it.The Pascal-generation GTX cards supported include: Titan XP Titan X GTX 1080 TI GTX 1080 GTX 1070 TI GTX 1070 GTX 1060 6GB The Volta-based Titan V and Turing-based GTX 1660 and 1660 TI are also supported. You’ll be able to get the Game Ready driver via GeForce Experience or on GeForce.com, along with some new whizzy demos.The new generation of RTX GPUs based on Nvidia’s Turing architecture arrived last summer, bringing two headline features: processing cores devoted to ray tracing (RT cores) — the same kind of rendering that’s used in almost every 3D animation — and Tensor cores for accelerating the neural network processing which underlies DLSS (Deep Learning Super-Sampling), Nvidia’s new AI-based scaling algorithms which more realistically simulate detail when the graphics processing load starts to punish performance.A less glamorous advance is the concurrent floating-point execution pipeline, which improves overall performance with parallel processing for the myriad calculations which underlie rendering.Ray tracing can make games look better, providing more realistic reflections and shadows, with a lot less work for the developers: The less manual tuning for individual scenes they have to do the more they’ll be able to concentrate on improving the overall visual quality of the game. 0 2:12 17 Photos The DXR programming interface makes ray tracing easily scalable for developers. In other words, they can define rules which determine how to prioritize rendering tasks like reflections and shadows and to what level of accuracy. DXR then applies those rules based on how powerful your hardware is.By opening DXR to the vast installed base of older GTX cards, developers have a lot more incentive to incorporate ray tracing into their games, without any extra work, than they have for the small number of pricey RTX GPUs in laptops and desktops.But here’s where the technical nonsense matters. Pascal-based cards, because they have no RT cores, are really not up to the processing challenges of full-on ray tracing, so DXR will dumb down the effects to fit within the capabilities of the card. And even then you’ll still be taking a performance hit — for effects that may be so subtle as to not be worth it.And it seems like the more noticeable the effect, the more processing it tends to require, with reflections (we like the shiny shiny) and global illumination (which can simulate the changing light over the course of a day, for example), being the most demanding.The newer priced-to-sell Turing-based GTX 1660 and 1660 Ti don’t have any RT cores either. What they do have is the improved floating-point performance. So they’ll still take a performance hit in exchange for slightly better realism, just not as much as some of the older cards.While ultimately I think ray tracing will become common — it always takes some time for new hardware technologies to ramp up and prices to come down — it’s possible that opening it up to cards that can’t do it justice may backfire. Though Nvidia’s working hard to manage expectations, I think the exercise will leave a lot of gamers with an “is that all there is?” letdown rather than a “this is so worth plonking down $350 to upgrade to RTX!” attitude. We’ll have to wait and see what actual gaming reveals. The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 See the first Nvidia RTX gaming laptops in actionlast_img read more

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. According to Guerin, a scientist at the Institute d’Optique Graduate School in Palaiseau (south of Paris), in order for an atom laser to be practicable for many applications, a method for creating longer wavelengths needs to be found. And, with his colleagues from Aspect’s Atom Optics Group of the Laboratoire Charles Fabry, he has. An article published in Physical Review Letters by Guerin and his coworkers Riou and Gaebler from the team led by Josse and Bouyer, is titled “Guided Quasicontinuous Atom Laser”; it demonstrates how this longer wavelength can be achieved.“By making our atom laser into a wave carrier, we can get rid of the acceleration of gravity,” says Guerin. “We can create an atom laser with a constant.” The French team’s Letter describes how such a laser works with trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC):“The BEC, in a state sensitive to both trapping potentials, is submitted to a rf outcoupler yielding atoms in a state sensitive only to the optical potential, resulting in an atom laser propagating along the weak confining axis of the optical trap.”“By using quasicontinuous outcoupling,” Guerin further explains, “we can get a beam with much less interaction.” A guided quasicontinuous atom laser, such the one described, would allow for better atomic motion control during propagation. Better atomic control would pave the way for more coherent atom sources for use in atom interferometry. Additionally, this set-up for a guided atom laser has the potential to provide a variety of other useful future applications. Quantum transport is another field that could benefit from the work performed by the team led by Josse and Bouyer. The members of the team, though, are especially interested in the interferometry aspects illuminated by this new type of atom laser: “We could use this scheme not only to guide atom laser beams, but also to separate and then recombine them to get an interferometer, which can be used to measure rotations or accelerations.” Guerin also points out that such interferometer could also be realized on atom chips.Designs that can produce atom-wave interferometry can yield progress in sensor technology. One of these technologies, says Guerin, includes “Creating a gyroscope with coherent atomic beams.” The applications and information that could come from the work by the team in France are varied and many. But rather than getting too carried away with the future, Guerin sticks with the basics. “There are two main points that we have realized because of this work,” he says. “First, we have a well-defined and large wavelength. This is new.” He continues his explanation: “And, second, we can control the amounts of interaction. It is great that we can control the flux of the atom laser, by controlling the flux, we control the density inside the beam.” And it is great for the world of atomic science as well.By Miranda Marquit, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com Explore further Is random lasing possible with a cold atom cloud?center_img One of the biggest differences between photons and atoms is that the latter are massive particles, making gravity is a huge factor. It can be seen as an advantage when designing new high accuracy atom interferometers based inertial sensors, but can be a major drawback when controlling atom laser beams. “Gravity makes for higher velocity,” William Guerin explains to PhysOrg.com, “and that means wavelengths become small.” Citation: Guiding an Atom Laser (2006, November 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-11-atom-laser.htmllast_img read more