first_imgEnlarge ImageSee more stories from CNET Magazine. Michael Muller Order a drink at an upscale bar lately and you’re likely to see a cold, new trend in your glass — luxury ice. These massive cubes or spheres (and sometimes hand-crafted shapes) aren’t for mere visual impact. Ice crafted with proper care melts slower, chills more efficiently, and helps beverages taste their best for longer.With a few advanced appliances, you too can create premium ice effortlessly right at home. But you’ll have to pay a hefty wad of cash up front. Fortunately, if you’re truly dedicated to ice that’s nice, you can produce opulent results on the cheap by using some everyday tools and a little elbow grease. Also read: LG’s new killer fridge feature: Clear ice for cocktailsice-magazine-shoot-black-and-white-alternates-08.jpgEnlarge ImageClear ice is making a comeback. Tyler Lizenby/CNET Why you want this iceBefore we made our ice in trays or took it from our refrigerator dispensers, it came in the form of natural ice blocks. Harvested from lakes and streams in frozen climates and hand cut into blocks, ice was delivered like the milkman left your milk.While this clear, rock-solid ice was brilliantly pure, it was not without its drawbacks. The blocks were heavy and unwieldy, and in an age before electricity, there was no way to keep them frozen forever. ice-magazine-shoot-black-and-white-alternates-23.jpgEnlarge ImageThis orb of hand-chiseled clear ice has a very stable molecular structure which fridge ice can’t match. Tyler Lizenby/CNET Modern freezers and ice machines fixed those problems, but convenience quickly trumped quality. Our appliances freeze water from the outside in. This traps any air inside the water and locks it as final ice cubes are formed. The result is cloudy, white ice. Unfortunately, white ice is ruining your drinks.Hope Clarke is an experienced bartender and the former head of beverage ice production at The Aviary restaurant in Chicago which garnered a nationwide James Beard Award for Outstanding Bar Program in 2013. She has since become obsessed with ice perfection and professionally advises posh bars, restaurants and food companies yearning to upgrade their chilled beverage game.ice-magazine-shoot-color-alternates-04.jpgEnlarge ImageBartender and clear ice expert Hope Clark knows nice ice when see sees it. Tyler Lizenby/CNET Clarke bemoans the pervasive use of white ice, calling the 30 years between 1970 and 2000 the dark ages for ice. (Frigidaire debuted the first in-door fridge ice maker in 1965.) And she doesn’t pull any punches when describing why she finds these common cubes so unappetizing. “White ice is very oxygenated, filled with lots of air bubbles,” she says. “As a result, it has an unstable structure which melts quickly and unevenly. If I was spending good money on spirits, I’d want to taste it instead of a drink that melts out into a diluted slosh in just five minutes.”But even when you’re not ponying up for premium bourbon, she feels white ice is no friend of soft drinks either.ice-magazine-shoot-color-alternates-17.jpgEnlarge ImageHere’s a globe of ice that’ll take a long time to melt. Tyler Lizenby/CNET “Since its surfaces are rough and porous, they tend to pull too many CO2 bubbles out of fizzy liquids, making them taste flat,” she says. “Clear ice, on the other hand, not only looks pretty, it’s rock solid, takes a while to melt and is free of flavor-changing impurities.”Slick ice from shiny machinesYou don’t have to frequent swanky bars and restaurants to get fancy ice in your glass. If your home bar budget is generous, you can use a number of premium appliances to create gourmet ice in large party-size quantities right from the comfort of your kitchen. For example, the Scotsman Brilliance Gourmet Cuber (model SCC50) is designed to make crystal-clear ice pellets in batches of up to 65 pounds a day.A similar product, the Clear Ice Machine, built by True Manufacturing, touts a daily production capacity of 70 pounds. It also has a color-changing LED light system to illuminate its interior storage bay which holds a maximum of 28 pounds of clear ice pellets. true-clear-ice-combo.jpgEnlarge ImageThe True Clear Ice machine on display at KBIS 2017. Brian Bennett/CNET The downside to both the Scotsman and True appliances is that they’re a hefty 15 inches wide, so they’re meant to sit under kitchen or bar counters, and both should be installed by a qualified dealer. What’s more, while neither company discloses exact pricing, it’s not unreasonable to expect to shell out upward of $2,000 for one of these gizmos. Great ice by handAs that will be out of range for most of us, there’s a more economical option which involves a bit more work. You don’t have to cut ice from a frozen lake up north; instead, you create this freezing lake effect inside your fridge in a process known as directional freezing. All that’s required, besides water and a freezer, is an insulated container of some kind. (A small plastic cooler, ice bucket or steel beer koozie will do.) Start by filling the container with water, and place it in your freezer without its cover. diy-clear-ice-combo.jpgEnlarge ImageMaking clear ice at home is easier than you think.After about 12 hours or so, water in the top portion of the vessel will freeze first since it’s exposed to cold air. And as those top ice crystals form, they push air bubbles and impurities downwards, producing the dreaded white ice. Here’s where you’ll need some muscle.After the top portion freezes (or the entire contents of the vessel solidify), remove the ice mass, place it on a towel-covered counter and chisel away the unwanted sections. I found a serrated bread knife and rubber-handled screwdriver (serving as a rubber mallet) got the job done.diy-clear-ice-combo-2.jpgEnlarge ImageUse a screwdriver and bread knife to carve your homemade clear ice. Tyler Lizenby/CNET I also used the power of directional freezing to make close to a dozen crystal-clear ice balls. Filling two silicone sphere ice molds ($8) with water then inverting them over a full ice bucket (suspended by a pair of flat kitchen faucet gaskets) did the trick. My test ice spheres still had a few bubbles trapped inside their centers, but they were far from white. clear-ice-sphere-homecombo.jpgEnlarge ImageWith a little patience and household gear you can make clear ice spheres too. Tyler Lizenby/CNET Nicer ice is for everyoneStartup company Wintersmiths sells clear ice kits that function in a similar way (inside your freezer) and promise better results. I admit I am tempted, but with an asking price range of $85 to $120, my low-budget tinkering makes more financial sense. But no matter which method you personally choose to obtain a more luxurious ice experience at home, I promise that your drinks will taste better. Because compared with pristine dense ice, weak fridge cubes can’t hold water.clear-sphere-drink-combo.jpgEnlarge ImageHomemade clear spheres and blocks add plenty of elegance to any beverage. Tyler Lizenby/CNET This story appears in the fall 2016 edition of CNET Magazine. For other magazine stories, click here See All Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown: ‘Acting is about reconnecting with a sense of play’ • 18 Jun 14 • The secret screen life of Being Frank star Jim Gaffigan Comments Appliances Smart Homecenter_img reading • In pursuit of perfect ice Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown on voicing a not-always-perfect pig Share your voice CNET Magazine CNET Magazine Tagslast_img read more

first_imgHarish Pednekar with Shah Rukh KhanPR HandoutHarish Pednekar, one of the most popular Entertainment journalists and an influencer has success coming all his way from the past 3 years. At 25, Harish made a great space for himself in the field of journalism and entrepreneurship. However, the journey hasn’t been a cakewalk for Harish. He worked hard to reach where he is in his professional life today. In 2017, he won ‘The Most Active Person of Media’ by the media fraternity.It was in 2016 when Harish started working for a Bollywood website called Business of Cinema or BoC. He was hired for doing backend work for the website, but his boss was impressed with him and granted a promotion. That’s when Harish got a chance to go on the field and interview various Bollywood celebrities like Shah Rukh Khan, Amitabh Bachchan, Katrina Kaif, Varun Dhawan and many others.In fact, Harish Pednekar’s first celebrity interview was with Shah Rukh Khan during Dilwale. For Harish, SRK is his inspiration and lucky charm. He believes that the passion and determination he has in himself is because Shah Rukh motivates him to do his best.At 21, Harish realised he wants to do more than working for someone else. That’s when he along with his friend Pallavi Mukherjee came up with an idea of starting their own Bollywood website called Pop Diaries. Harish and Pallavi are partners of movie portal which started 3 years ago.Because of its positive and interesting content, his movie portal came into celebrity and PRs attention immediately and they started loving it. In these 2 years, Harish and Pallavi’s website have interviewed almost all the top celebrities which helped them to be in the top with other Bollywood sites that are functioning for more than 8-10 years.Harish says in a statement, “I always wanted to do something big, but I know I have to start from the bottom. There were hurdles and failures of course, but I knew if I want to create something of my own, I have to be positive and never give up. That’s what I did.”About Pop Diaries, Harish says, “I call it as my baby. But it wouldn’t have been possible with my friend Pallavi who is the partner of my website. I want to bring in positive content on my website rather than doing gossips because that’s everywhere. We’ve been doing it earlier and have bigger plans which our readers will get to see in the coming time.”last_img read more

first_imgBy Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent@StacyBrownMediaThey are sisters – twins to be correct – and both are medical doctors and were born and raised in a town in Ohio called Twinsburg, a segregated, lower-income and primarily African American area.Both say they’ve always been drawn to science and excelled academically which led to each being in Advanced Placement and Honors courses in school.Twin doctor’s Brandi and Brittani Jackson (Photo Courtesy of Brandi and Brittani Jackson)Frequently the only African Americans in their classrooms, the twins endured their share of racism. There’s a pressure to perform and be on when you’re the only person of color in a space, lest you inadvertently perpetuate stereotypes about your race to non-people of color, they said.But, none of that prevented them from succeeding.Both would go on to become elected as chief residents in their respective residency programs at the University of Illinois and today they are practicing physicians whose primary patients include many in underserved populations in Chicago – Brandi in the Department of Psychiatry and Brittani in the College of Medicine-Family Medicine.In an effort to give back, the twins have co-founded Medlikeme.com, a resource for high school, pre-med and others to submit questions that will be answered by medical students, physicians and other professionals.The website is scheduled to launch Nov. 5.In a Q&A with NNPA Newswire, they spoke about their lives and profession.NNPA: At what point did you decide you were going to be a doctor?Brittani: I was not the kid that knew from an early age that I wanted to be a doctor. It was a slow realization. I do think the lack of societal images of black doctors made it hard for me to visualize myself in that role. I’ve always loved science and found enjoyment helping others, but being a doctor wasn’t something that honestly clicked as a viable option until the second half of college, after I saw a black female doctor, in person, for the first time in my life.Brandi: I also decided in college. I had the opportunity to study abroad in East Africa (my first time leaving the country!). As part of my program, I visited a hospital in Uganda. I remember that all of the doctors and the nurses looked like me. I was mesmerized as I watched them do their work. After that semester, I knew for sure that I wanted to be one of them. I had considered being a doctor long before that but being in a hospital full of black doctors somehow made it feel more attainable.NNPA: When you look at the numbers, the stats, obviously there are very few African American doctors and even fewer African American women doctors. Was that a factor in your decision to be a doctor?Brittani: The fact that there are very few African American doctors wasn’t a huge factor in my original decision to become a doctor. It is, however, something that both made the journey more challenging and ultimately more rewarding. It’s hard to envision yourself as something you don’t see. But as I got further into medicine, I realized that maybe I could be a visual reminder to someone who looks like me, that they can be anything. At least that’s my hope.Brandi: When I decided to become a doctor, I did think about the fact there are few African Americans in the field. Knowing that didn’t exactly motivate me. In fact, intimidated me. For much of my training, I felt like medicine was not meant for a person like me. It took years for me to feel like I was just as smart and capable as my classmates. Now, I know that I bring a unique perspective to medicine that the field desperately needs. When most people think of a doctor, they don’t picture an African American woman. My sister and I want to change that.NNPA:  When did you realize or find out that your sister would also become a doctor?Brittani: I had done a pre-med summer program in New York City, and I remember telling Brandi about it. It was through that program that I got my first taste of what it was like to be a doctor and I was hooked. I was in the OR and saw a beating human heart. That changes you. I started thinking about medicine seriously then and talked to Brandi about it. I told her about seeing a black female doctor and how amazing that was. I started to believe I could do it and I think that rubbed off on her.Brandi: It did rub off on me. By the time I studied abroad in Uganda during college, the seed had already been planted. Knowing that my sister and I would be going on the journey together made the decision much less nerve-wracking. We were each other’s biggest supporters throughout our journeys. I don’t know if I would have had the courage to pursue medicine if I did not have my sister by my side. We were each other’s inspiration.NNPA: What has been your biggest challenge in pursuing and then ultimately becoming a doctor?Brittani: My biggest challenge came in the first few years of medical school. I had a very difficult transition. Brandi and I decided to go to different medical schools, in an experiment in a way, since we had always been with each other our entire lives. We wanted to learn who we were apart from each other. What I didn’t realize how much support I was losing by being away from her. I struggled to adjust. I felt like an imposter in those days; like I wasn’t smart or capable enough to be where I was. It took years to figure out that that was not true. It was a lie I believed for a long time about myself, until I realized that I was bringing something valuable and unique to medicine that isn’t common. The academics actually came easier after that, and everything else fell into place.Brandi: I think Brittani said it best. Those years that we were separated in medical school were really tough! I took a lot of train rides to visit Brittani during those years. I went through a similar “imposter syndrome” during medical school. I didn’t realize how much I had internalized the belief that I was not “supposed” to be a doctor. Overcoming that false belief was the most important things I did in my life.NNPA: How can academic institutions and even families help improve the number of Black doctors in the country? Why do you believe African Americans shy away or at least fail to consider the medical profession?Brittani: That’s a big question with a complicated answer. One reason I think African Americans shy away from the medical profession is because they don’t see representations growing up of black physicians. Most of us do not have doctors in the family or have friends who are doctors.On top of that, there are very few media representations of African Americans being doctors or holding other science-related careers. Again, it’s hard to imagine yourself being something you don’t see. So, I think those of us in medicine who are African Americans do have a responsibility to be as visible when we can manage, as a means of showing the next generation what’s possible.There is also a very large barrier to entry to the medical field. It’s a confusing thing to navigate if you do not have someone showing you the way. There’s also the extreme financial burden it places on applicants. That financial burden hits the African American community to a disproportionate extent as we are more likely than our peers to be from socioeconomically-disadvantaged backgrounds. There is institutional racism and sexism which are seamlessly built into our higher education and healthcare system to contend with as well. Those systems exert their damage in both overt and subtle ways over time. Those forces hurt you in material ways.They undermine your confidence and hinder your ability to perform at your peak. With that in mind, a lot of us, especially African Americans, are starting off with additional barriers.Brandi: As far as institutions go, I think too many operate under the premise that their work is done once they get a handful of African American or other minority students through their doors.That shouldn’t be the case. There are so many unique challenges that students of color face in higher education, that if institutions are serious about supporting diversity, they really have to be intentional about putting support systems in place. It’s not just about getting African Americans through the door but helping them thrive in an environment that was not designed with them in mind, as higher education was not.NNPA: What’s your primary message to other black women who might aspire to be a doctor?Brittani: I want them to know that although the road is long, it is worth it. At the end of the day, on the other side of the struggle, there are real people who need someone like you in their corner, fighting the good fight alongside them. Medicine needs you. Your future patients need you. You got this!Brandi: You are smart. You are powerful. And you belong in medicine. Quiet the voices (inside and outside) that tell you differently. Your future patients will benefit from the perspective you bring, and your unique identity is your greatest asset. Remember that you are not alone.NNPA: Which one of you are older and is there any pride being the older twin?Brittani: I’m older (by two whole minutes!) and I like to think wiser as well! After all, I learned a lot about the world in those two minutes.Brandi: Older does not necessarily mean wiser…clearly.NNPA: Are you at all surprised at yours and your sister’s success? Brittani: It’s surreal to have made it through medical school and residency and to be a practicing physician. It has been my “impossible” dream for so long. I think before I always thought of doctors as these superhuman beings that were just unreachable. Now I know that we doctors struggle and make mistakes just like everyone else. We are painfully human.On the other hand, I believe a lot of success is a mental game. A lot of my strength came from my family and other loved ones, who always lovingly reminded me who I was. They overwhelmed me with positivity and support whenever I stumbled on this journey. Over time, I came to believe in myself the way they did. Once I started truly believing in myself and my abilities, I got to the point where no negativity I encountered could keep me down for long. I just kept getting back up. When you have that attitude, I believe success is inevitable.Brandi: Brittani put it beautifully, and I agree. I feel humbled by all that we have achieved. I’m looking forward to helping other achieve the same success.NNPA: Can you describe MedLikeMe?Brittani: MedLikeMe is a free online community dedicated to minorities and non-traditional students who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine. In essence, we wanted to create the resource we wish we’d had when we were trying to figure out how to be doctors. High schoolers, pre-med and other pre-health students submit questions on the site, and real medical students, physicians and other professionals answer their questions. It is our attempt to bridge the gap between minorities and non-traditional students who are interested in medicine but don’t know where to start and those who have lived it. We also hope to highlight and share the stories of practicing professionals who have overcome struggle to succeed so that those in the community can have a source of inspiration. It’s definitely a work of passion.Brandi: For us, it’s not enough to say, “we made it”. We want to help others do it too. It’s our way of giving back for the hundreds of people who have helped us on our journey through medicine. We want to pay it forward. We’re hoping to change the face of medicine, together.For more information about their website, visit http://beta.medlikeme.com/our-story/. Additional information about the doctors can also be found at http://www.uifightdepression.psych.uic.edu/psych.uic.edu_______________________Excerpt:“For us, it’s not enough to say, “we made it”. We want to help others do it too. It’s our way of giving back for the hundreds of people who have helped us on our journey through medicine. We want to pay it forward. We’re hoping to change the face of medicine, together.”last_img read more

first_imgThis photo, taken circa 1886, shows one of the first Pawling & Harnischfeger machine shops. The building, located at the corner of South First and East Oregon streets in Milwaukee, was constructed in 1886. The former P&H facility is not far from the Solvay Coke site where P&H successor Komatsu Mining Corp. recently announced plans to build a $285 million headquarters. — This photo is from the Wisconsin Historical Society’s Harnischfeger Corp. collection. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img